Teachers Change Lives (and you can help them do it!)

Teachers Change Lives (and you can help them do it!)


Last week, the kids and I headed to the park at the end of our block.  After we had been playing for a few minutes, a man strolled onto the playground with his grandson. I instantly recognized him as my 11th grade math teacher.   He remembered me too (or so he says!) and we had a nice time catching up and talking about the neighborhood and summer plans.

Going to the Park (Playground)

The thing is, I don’t remember too much about middle and high school (perhaps I’ve blocked out those dark dark days), but I do remember my teachers.  I remember the ones who took that extra step to make education really meaningful.  The ones who decorated the classroom to coordinate with themes or the ones who brought in a slew of supplies so we could creatively engage in the day’s lesson.

I remember my seventh grade Reading teacher, Mr. Stanton and the amazing books we read and the projects we did in his class.  I remember my English teacher, Mrs. Whitmore, who made me feel like my dream to become a writer could actually come true.  I burned through many an eraser in that class, but I walked away with a stack of essays that’s I’m still proud of (you know, in a nostalgic sort of way).

Teachers Change Lives!

Angie Smith, in her recent book, Chasing God said something similar:

The teacher was returning our papers, and mine landed on my desk like all the others had, with marks indicating I had done the work.  I didn’t think any more of it, but as she walked past me again, she paused and knelt down by my desk, eye-to-eye.  She tapped my paper with her finger and smiled, quietly making a declaration that breathed purpose into me.

“You, my dear, were born to be a writer.”

She gave my hand a little squeeze and continued returning papers… That’s what great teachers do, you know.  They remind you that what you’ve done is nothing in comparison to what you are called to do, and they plant a seed that will grow in spite of it.  (p 39)

Teaching is a hard profession.  It takes a lot of prep work, sorting through activities, thinking of ways to freshen up lessons and creative ways to keep order in the class.  It also takes a lot of supplies.   Teachers spend money every year out of their own pocket, especially in underfunded areas.   When parents are out loading their carts during the “back to school” shopping sales, so are teachers — using money from their own pockets to enhance the classroom experience for their classroom kids.  Some of these teachers are doing amazing, innovative things in the classroom and you can help them do more!

Teacher's Change

Office Depot and Adopt-A-Classroom have partnered to raise awareness about teachers, and all that they do in the lives of their students.  Check out this amazing teacher, Jeffrey Wright.  Mr. Wright is a physics teacher in Louisville, Kentucky. His classroom is full of experiments from plasma balls, to hovercrafts. He teaches students to apply what they learn to real life. A big part of science is failing, and he teaches students that it’s okay to fail but to keep trying. He believes you have to give back to make the world brighter.

Teachers are amazing people!  They truly are shaping the future of America and I would love for us to partner with them in making the classroom experience the best it can be!

How to Register Your Classroom as a Teacher

  1. Go to Teachers Change Lives website (http://clvr.li/1emq4KF)
  2. Click on the red box that says “Register Your Classroom,” which will take you to the Adopt-A-Classroom website
  3. Follow the corresponding steps from there

How to Donate to a Teacher

  1. Go to Teachers Change Lives website (http://clvr.li/1emq4KF)
  2. Click on the teal “Donate to a Teacher” box on the Teachers Change Liveswebsite (http://clvr.li/1emq4KF), which will take you to the Adopt-A-Classroom website
  3. Follow the corresponding steps from there

I was selected for this opportunity as a member of Clever Girls Collective and the content and opinions expressed here are all my own.

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